Tag Archives: single

OKCupid – do we want passion or dedication?

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Photo cred: independent.co.uk

OkCupid. It’s a fine online-dating service. Free. Not sketchy, unless you’re meeting someone “normal” and then he tells you he can’t drive and “hey, can you pick me up?” and “sure” and then you find out he has gangrene in his leg that prevents him from driving. The gangrene is no problem – the sketchy lie and inability to think outside-the-box (Uber much?) are.

One of the questions on OKC – you answer a series of questions to determine how much of a match you are with other daters – has interested me of late.

“What makes for a better relationship: passion or dedication?”

I know enough about lasting relationships to believe dedication is the answer.

Could the issue be that people view passion as an all/nothing thing? Just like gender, passion operates on a sliding scale. Sometimes you will be attracted to your partner. Other times you won’t. It’s in those moments that dedication takes over – and you find the passion again.

Sometimes I wonder if other daters (men) think that “dedication” is an unsexy answer. I’ve never seen a guy answer “dedication.” I get it. It’s scary to think about getting stuck in a sexless relationship/marriage. Even girls don’t got time for dat. Maybe guys are answering based on girls’ perceptions. I guess if I saw a “dedication” answer I might think the guy was a bit feminine too.

ZjvfdN_QIf you believe recent studies – and Kate Hudson – monogamy is not a natural state for human beings. We can talk nation states, institutions and power vehicles that impose monogamy upon us, but that’s not the point. If you want to be in a monogamous relationship, know it will take work. Sometimes it’s ugly. If you’re looking for the happily-ever-after, you have to trudge through the unhappily-forabit-after. But did you know – men who help out around the house are found more desirable by their female mates? A prime example that demonstrates dedication can lead to passion, maybe a hotter passion than before.

More on this:

Dating rule No. 1: The “Moonlight Sonata”

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Have you hard Moonlight Sonata? The one by Beethoven?

I’m sure you have, even if you don’t know it by name. It’s haunting. It’s slow. And it’s basically the best musical interpretation of what it must feel like to be incredibly, dramatically, emo-y depressed. I imagine young Werther might have used the song as the track he took his life to, only they didn’t have record players in the 1700s, the penetrating silence around him making his literary suicide that much more dramatic.

Ain’t nobody got time for that.

And still, I’m sitting in my apartment on a Sunday afternoon, writing this as I listen to the sonata on repeat. I’ve come to know its twists and turns during emo periods of past. You think you can out-emo my emo? Go listen to your Linkin Park CD. I’ve got real problems Imma share with you.

As a 32-year-old single woman living in a society that wants me to get married and have a baby or eight, and living in the same type of headspace, I wonder when I’m going to get there. You see, I’m in the throes of heartbreak. Unrequited love. Again. You too? Let’s wallow together.

The perpetually single. I don’t know if I subscribe to the idea, but God knows there’s some kind of hamster-wheel situation going on in my dating world. In an attempt to make some sense of it all, this organized chaos that makes up life and relationships, I found my way back to the piano after having not played it with any regularity for 18 years. Naturally, I started with Moonlight Sonata. And so far my efforts have been finger-twistingly short-lived and frustration-riddled.

In fact, the whole dating cycle is pretty much the same cycle I’ve encountered practicing Beethoven’s joint. All those fucking sharps!! Each time you think you may have picked up a couple of extra measures of the piece (one with a four-page score), you find on the next play that, no, maybe you mastered a new note but you’re still not ready to move past any number of various points on page one. It’s murky really, and it’s a bumpy-ass road, navigating through those 88 weighted keys.

credit: Wikihow - INCREDIBLE PICTURE

credit: Wikihow – INCREDIBLE PICTURE

When do you cut your losses and run? On a song or a boy? My 34-year-old roommate recently broke up with her boyfriend of three years. She feels she wasted valuable baby-making time. She tells me I’m lucky to not be tied down to the wrong person. Oh, I’m not tied down. Just that I keep ripping my heart out and putting it on a platter for someone to continually, but politely, decline to take care of.  

My crush? He’s been good to me. He’s been honest. And the journey is kind of the same with all these would-be relationships. Sometimes the playing is smooth, but messy – and damnit if you didn’t miss some of those fucking sharps (always the sharps!!). Sometimes it’s never smooth. Sometimes you sit down to play but get up and eat cereal and look unrecognizable lying upside-down on the couch watching any number of shows that make you feel like a little less of a human being.

The thing with trying out Moonlight Sonata – it wasn’t for nil. The very act made me realize learning to play it is something I need to work up to. Doesn’t matter why but I’m not ready for it now. I think it means I start learning a new song.

Dating Rule 1 – “The Moonlight Sonata”: Sharp objects in the path are signs it’s time to re-evaluate. Recalibrate. Shit literally and figuratively shouldn’t be this hard.

Associated Goal: Move on but remain open. Approach a new song. Have the courage to change course.

The biological clock. Can we dismiss all that fear?

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Jo March

I remember the first time I came across Penelope Trunk’s blog about making marriage a priority. It scared the bejesus out of me. I was (and am) 31. I had never really considered that I was a ticking time bomb. I started dating 5 years ago. I learned how to hold down a job two years ago. In fact, I haven’t known enough about relationships and how they could feel until recently, and I still don’t know if that information is accurate. Each time I run into another article about choosing career over kids it kind of feels like society has pulled a gun on me but hasn’t given me the tools or enough warning to prepare accordingly.

The problem – as I see it – is that there are no answers. There is the typical advice: troll Ok Cupid, lose weight, work with a therapist, freeze your eggs. Be the person you want to meet! All good things, but not necessarily things that calm you down when you’re sitting at your desk blogging, when you should be working, and thinking about your barren life and the sad moments you will spend sitting on park benches in the future watching as children who look like their parents giggle and run by.

I’ve dated a lot of people. I’ve put in some work.

But what can we do that makes us feel like we’re making a difference in our search for a mate, without efforting?

Here’s my list.

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